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Sign the Petition: Stop Torture in Georgia Prisons

 
Dear Governor Deal:
 
As the international community has examined the research, including over a century of scientific studies suggesting that prolonged solitary confinement leads to irreversable mental degredation, experts have found that use of segregation for period in excess of fifteen days constitutes torture and cannot be supported under existing international standards for human rights.  
 
The abuses of solitary confinement are now being litigated in the Federal Courts, and reviewed in Congressional hearings.  The treatment of this nations' inmates has become the subject of international reviews of this nation's human rights record.  
 
We appeal to you that you may take the actions necessary to end this torture conducted in our name and with our tax dollars.  
 
If necessary, we ask that you join us in our fast conducted in solidarity with the Hunger Strikers in your care.  If this matter has not been resolved by July 2nd, we're asking Georgians of faith and conscience to refrain from food on that day as a way of 'remember(ing) . . . those who are being tortured' and our relationship with them and the conditions under which they survive.  
 
It is our fervent hope that through fasting and prayer, you too may see the imperative for the changes in Georgia public policy necessary to end these practices which have no place in civilized society.  We hope that by doing so you may know the courage to carry such proposals to the policy making bodies of this state.  
 
 

Petition to the GA Commission on Criminal Justice Reform

 

Petition to the Georgia Commission on Criminal Justice Reform

We the undersigned Georgia residents believe a thorough re-evaluation of our state's criminal justice system is long overdue, and we welcome the formation of the Governor's Commission on Criminal Justice Reform. But the Commission's current vision of what constiutes such reform and even who the relevant stakeholders in such a process must be are seriously flawed.

Our state's current policies of over-policing, racial selectivity in enforcement and sentencing, over-incarceration and lifelong sanctions against offenders exact enormous economic, health and human tolls upon the communities and families those offenders come from and return to. The stakeholders, therefore, in criminal justice reform are not just sheriffs, judges, chambers of commerce, legislators, contractors and well-connected insiders. The real stakeholders include the imprisoned themelves, including juveniles, and the formerly incarcerated, along with their families and communities, none of whom are currently represented on the Commission, and none of whom this Commission, as currently envisioned, intends to consult in the formulation of its recommendations to the legislature.

We therefore demand that the Commission hold multiple public hearings in communities around the state, including Savannah, Augusta, Macon, and Columbus, and at least one apiece inside an adult a juvenile institution, in order to solicit input into its deliberations from more of the real stakeholders in reform, and that the Commission include in its recommendations, at a minimum the following:

  • An immediate and permanent end to all incarceration of juveniles with adults;

  • The decriminalization of mental illness, homelessness, drug use and immigration status;

  • The provision of decent health care and educational opportunities inside prisons and jails;

  • Recognition and abolition of longstanding racial selectivity in law enforcement, prosecution and sentencing;

  • The provision of clear paths to expungment of convictions and cessation of lifelong discrimination against former offenders in employment and public benefits of all kinds.

     

What Fake Reform of the Prison State Looks Like: Georgia's Criminal Justice Reform Commission

 

 

 

by BAR managing editor Bruce A. Dixon

In Georgia, where prisoners staged a brief and courageous strike for their human rights last December, the state's new governor is talking “prison reform.” But the vision of Georgia's new commission on criminal justice reform seems to be less about healing the wounds caused by racist hyper-incarceration than saving the state money. What kind of “prison reform” does that lead to?

LEAP Cofounder Peter Christ Debunks Prohibition Myths



Law Enforcement Against Prohibition co-founder, Peter Christ, retired police chief with twenty years on the force, appears on Buffalo's WGRZ-TV and quickly debunks the myths surrounding the nation's insane policy of drug prohibition.

Profiting Off Prisoners - Georgia contracts with ten private prisons

Follow this link for a graphical sense of the scope of private prisons in the US Prison State.

What Fake Reform of the Prison State Looks Like: Georgia's Criminal Justice Reform Commission

 
In Georgia, where prisoners staged a brief and courageous strike for their human rights last December, the state's new governor is talking “prison reform.” But the vision of Georgia's new commission on criminal justice reform seems to be less about healing the wounds caused by racist hyper-incarceration than saving the state money. What kind of “prison reform” does that lead to?

July 1 Hunger Strike to Commence at California's Pelican Bay

A Black Agenda Radio commentary by Glen Ford

Vowing to die, if necessary, inmates at the dreaded “SHU” section of California’s Pelican Bay prison begin a hunger strike on July 1. “Like the strike by inmates in Georgia’s prison system late last year, the Pelican Bay protest cuts across racial lines.” The core issue: a brutal, soul-killing policy of solitary confinement and other deprivations aimed at turning every inmate into a snitch on everyone else.

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Chatham County lets contract for 852 new jail beds

Joint Venture Nabs Chatham County Jail Project http://www.correctionalnews.com/articles/2010/12/29/joint-venture-nabs-c... (12/29/2010) SAVANNAH, Ga. — A joint venture of Oldcastle Precast Modular and a Hunt/Mills joint venture will be providing the precast concrete prison cells and building components for the new $71 million, 330,000 square-foot expansion of the Chatham County Detention Center in Georgia.

Welcome to EndMassIncarceration.org

The spiraling costs of mass incarceration have not made our communities safer.
 
That is the bottom line.
 

2005's Ten Worst Places to be Black

by BAR Managing Editor Bruce Dixon

This article was originally published in Black Commentator on July 14, 2005 

"It's high time to begin constructing useful indices with which to measure the quality of life, not for just a fortunate few, but for the broad masses of our people."

The pervasive corporate media bubble, which grossly distorts the views most Americans have of the world beyond their shores, and of life in America’s black one-eighth, operates to fool African Americans, too.  While a fortunate few of us are doing very well indeed, and many more are hanging on as best we can, the conditions of life for a substantial chunk of black America are not substantially improving, and appear to be getting much worse. 

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by Dr. Radut